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The Adverntures of Tom Sawyer Chapter1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

Real Robbers Seize the Box of Gold
(Chapter 26)

ABOUT noon the next day the boys arrived at the dead tree; they had come for their tools. Tom was impatient to go to the haunted house; Huck was measurably so, also -- but suddenly said:

"Lookyhere, Tom, do you know what day it is?"

Tom mentally ran over the days of the week, and then quickly lifted his eyes with a startled look in them --

"My! I never once thought of it, Huck!"

"Well, I didn't neither, but all at once it popped onto me that it was Friday."

"Blame it, a body can't be too careful, Huck. We might 'a' got into an awful scrape, tackling such a thing on a Friday."

"~might! Better say we would! There's some lucky days, maybe, but Friday ain't."

"Any fool knows that. I don't reckon YOU was the first that found it out, Huck."

"Well, I never said I was, did I? And Friday ain't all, neither. I had a rotten bad dream last night -- dreampt about rats."

"No! Sure sign of trouble. Did they fight?"

"No."

"Well, that's good, Huck. When they don't fight it's only a sign that there's trouble around, you know. All we got to do is to look mighty sharp and keep out of it. We'll drop this thing for to-day, and play. Do you know Robin Hood, Huck?"

"No. Who's Robin Hood?"

"Why, he was one of the greatest men that was ever in England -- and the best. He was a robber."

"Cracky, I wisht I was. Who did he rob?"

"Only sheriffs and bishops and rich people and kings, and such like. But he never bothered the poor. He loved 'em. He always divided up with 'em perfectly square."

"Well, he must 'a' been a brick."

"I bet you he was, Huck. Oh, he was the noblest man that ever was. They ain't any such men now, I can tell you. He could lick any man in England, with one hand tied behind him; and he could take his yew bow and plug a ten-cent piece every time, a mile and a half."

"What's a yew bow?"

"I don't know. It's some kind of a bow, of course. And if he hit that dime only on the edge he would set down and cry – and curse. But we'll play Robin Hood -- it's nobby fun. I'll learn you."

"I'm agreed."

So they played Robin Hood all the afternoon, now and then casting a yearning eye down upon the haunted house and passing a remark about the morrow's prospects and possibilities there. As the sun began to sink into the west they took their way homeward athwart the long shadows of the trees and soon were buried from sight in the forests of Cardiff Hill.

On Saturday, shortly after noon, the boys were at the dead tree again. They had a smoke and a chat in the shade, and then dug a little in their last hole, not with great hope, but merely because Tom said there were so many cases where people had given up a treasure after getting down within six inches of it, and then somebody else had come along and turned it up with a single thrust of a shovel. The thing failed this time, however, so the boys shouldered their tools and went away feeling that they had not trifled with fortune, but had fulfilled all the requirements that belong to the business of treasure-hunting.

When they reached the haunted house there was something so weird and grisly about the dead silence that reigned there under the baking sun, and something so depressing about the loneliness and desolation of the place, that they were afraid, for a moment, to venture in. Then they crept to the door and took a trembling peep. They saw a weed-grown, floorless room, unplastered, an ancient fireplace, vacant windows, a ruinous staircase; and here, there, and everywhere hung ragged and abandoned cobwebs. They presently entered, softly, with quickened pulses, talking in whispers, ears alert to catch the slightest sound, and muscles tense and ready for instant retreat.

In a little while familiarity modified their fears and they gave the place a critical and interested examination, rather admiring their own boldness, and wondering at it, too. Next they wanted to look up-stairs. This was something like cutting off retreat, but they got to daring each other, and of course there could be but one result -- they threw their tools into a corner and made the ascent. Up there were the same signs of decay. In one corner they found a closet that promised mystery, but the promise was a fraud – there was nothing in it. Their courage was up now and well in hand. They were about to go down and begin work when --

"Sh!" said Tom.

"What is it?" whispered Huck, blanching with fright.

"Sh! ... There! ... Hear it?"

"Yes! ... Oh, my! Let's run!"

"Keep still! Don't you budge! They're coming right toward the door."

The boys stretched themselves upon the floor with their eyes to knot-holes in the planking, and lay waiting, in a misery of fear.

"They've stopped.... No -- coming.... Here they are. Don't whisper another word, Huck. My goodness, I wish I was out of this!"

Two men entered. Each boy said to himself: "There's the old deaf and dumb Spaniard that's been about town once or twice lately -- never saw t'other man before."

"T'other" was a ragged, unkempt creature, with nothing very pleasant in his face. The Spaniard was wrapped in a serape; he had bushy white whiskers; long white hair flowed from under his sombrero, and he wore green goggles. When they came in, "t'other" was talking in a low voice; they sat down on the ground, facing the door, with their backs to the wall, and the speaker continued his remarks. His manner became less guarded and his words more distinct as he proceeded:

"No," said he, "I've thought it all over, and I don't like it. It's dangerous."

"Dangerous!" grunted the "deaf and dumb" Spaniard -- to the vast surprise of the boys. "Milksop!"

This voice made the boys gasp and quake. It was Injun Joe's! There was silence for some time. Then Joe said:

"What's any more dangerous than that job up yonder -- but nothing's come of it."

"That's different. Away up the river so, and not another house about. 'Twon't ever be known that we tried, anyway, long as we didn't succeed."

"Well, what's more dangerous than coming here in the daytime! -- anybody would suspicion us that saw us."

"I know that. But there warn't any other place as handy after that fool of a job. I want to quit this shanty. I wanted to yesterday, only it warn't any use trying to stir out of here, with those infernal boys playing over there on the hill right in full view."

"Those infernal boys" quaked again under the inspiration of this remark, and thought how lucky it was that they had remembered it was Friday and concluded to wait a day. They wished in their hearts they had waited a year.

The two men got out some food and made a luncheon. After a long and thoughtful silence, Injun Joe said:

"Look here, lad -- you go back up the river where you belong. Wait there till you hear from me. I'll take the chances on dropping into this town just once more, for a look. We'll do that 'dangerous' job after I've spied around a little and think things look well for it. Then for Texas! We'll leg it together!"

This was satisfactory. Both men presently fell to yawning, and Injun Joe said:

"I'm dead for sleep! It's your turn to watch."

He curled down in the weeds and soon began to snore. His comrade stirred him once or twice and he became quiet. Presently the watcher began to nod; his head drooped lower and lower, both men began to snore now.

The boys drew a long, grateful breath. Tom whispered:

"Now's our chance -- come!"

Huck said:

"I can't -- I'd die if they was to wake."

Tom urged -- Huck held back. At last Tom rose slowly and softly, and started alone. But the first step he made wrung such a hideous creak from the crazy floor that he sank down almost dead with fright. He never made a second attempt. The boys lay there counting the dragging moments till it seemed to them that time must be done and eternity growing gray; and then they were grateful to note that at last the sun was setting.

Now one snore ceased. Injun Joe sat up, stared around -- smiled grimly upon his comrade, whose head was drooping upon his knees -- stirred him up with his foot and said:

"Here! you're a watchman, ain't you! All right, though -- nothing's happened."

"My! have I been asleep?"

"Oh, partly, partly. Nearly time for us to be moving, pard. What'll we do with what little swag we've got left?"

"I don't know -- leave it here as we've always done, I reckon. No use to take it away till we start south. Six hundred and fifty in silver's something to carry."

"Well -- all right -- it won't matter to come here once more."

"No -- but I'd say come in the night as we used to do -- it's better."

"Yes: but look here; it may be a good while before I get the right chance at that job; accidents might happen; 'tain't in such a very good place; we'll just regularly bury it -- and bury it deep."

"Good idea," said the comrade, who walked across the room, knelt down, raised one of the rearward hearthstones and took out a bag that jingled pleasantly. He subtracted from it twenty or thirty dollars for himself and as much for Injun Joe, and passed the bag to the latter, who was on his knees in the corner, now, digging with his bowie-knife.

The boys forgot all their fears, all their miseries in an instant. With gloating eyes they watched every movement. Luck! – the splendor of it was beyond all imagination! Six hundred dollars was money enough to make half a dozen boys rich! Here was treasure-hunting under the happiest auspices -- there would not be any bothersome uncertainty as to where to dig. They nudged each other every moment -- eloquent nudges and easily understood, for they simply meant -- "Oh, but ain't you glad NOW we're here!"

Joe's knife struck upon something.

"Hello!" said he.

"What is it?" said his comrade.

"Half-rotten plank -- no, it's a box, I believe. Here -- bear a hand and we'll see what it's here for. Never mind, I've broke a hole."

He reached his hand in and drew it out --

"Man, it's money!"

The two men examined the handful of coins. They were gold. The boys above were as excited as themselves, and as delighted.

Joe's comrade said:

"We'll make quick work of this. There's an old rusty pick over amongst the weeds in the corner the other side of the fireplace – I saw it a minute ago."

He ran and brought the boys' pick and shovel. Injun Joe took the pick, looked it over critically, shook his head, muttered something to himself, and then began to use it. The box was soon unearthed. It was not very large; it was iron bound and had been very strong before the slow years had injured it. The men contemplated the treasure awhile in blissful silence.

"Pard, there's thousands of dollars here," said Injun Joe.

"'Twas always said that Murrel's gang used to be around here one summer," the stranger observed.

"I know it," said Injun Joe; "and this looks like it, I should say."

"Now you won't need to do that job."

The half-breed frowned. Said he:

"You don't know me. Least you don't know all about that thing. 'Tain't robbery altogether -- it's revenge!" and a wicked light flamed in his eyes. "I'll need your help in it. When it's finished -- then Texas. Go home to your Nance and your kids, and stand by till you hear from me."

"Well -- if you say so; what'll we do with this -- bury it again?"

"Yes. [Ravishing delight overhead.] No! by the great Sachem, no! [Profound distress overhead.] I'd nearly forgot. That pick had fresh earth on it! [The boys were sick with terror in a moment.] What business has a pick and a shovel here? What business with fresh earth on them? Who brought them here -- and where are they gone? Have you heard anybody? -- seen anybody? What! bury it again and leave them to come and see the ground disturbed? Not exactly -- not exactly. We'll take it to my den."

"Why, of course! Might have thought of that before. You mean Number One?"

"No -- Number Two -- under the cross. The other place is bad -- too common."

"All right. It's nearly dark enough to start."

Injun Joe got up and went about from window to window cautiously peeping out. Presently he said:

"Who could have brought those tools here? Do you reckon they can be up-stairs?"

The boys' breath forsook them. Injun Joe put his hand on his knife, halted a moment, undecided, and then turned toward the stairway. The boys thought of the closet, but their strength was gone. The steps came creaking up the stairs -- the intolerable distress of the situation woke the stricken resolution of the lads -- they were about to spring for the closet, when there was a crash of rotten timbers and Injun Joe landed on the ground amid the débris of the ruined stairway. He gathered himself up cursing, and his comrade said:

"Now what's the use of all that? If it's anybody, and they're up there, let them stay there -- who cares? If they want to jump down, now, and get into trouble, who objects? It will be dark in fifteen minutes -- and then let them follow us if they want to. I'm willing. In my opinion, whoever hove those things in here caught a sight of us and took us for ghosts or devils or something. I'll bet they're running yet."

Joe grumbled awhile; then he agreed with his friend that what daylight was left ought to be economized in getting things ready for leaving. Shortly afterward they slipped out of the house in the deepening twilight, and moved toward the river with their precious box.

Tom and Huck rose up, weak but vastly relieved, and stared after them through the chinks between the logs of the house. Follow? Not they. They were content to reach ground again without broken necks, and take the townward track over the hill. They did not talk much. They were too much absorbed in hating themselves -- hating the ill luck that made them take the spade and the pick there. But for that, Injun Joe never would have suspected. He would have hidden the silver with the gold to wait there till his "revenge" was satisfied, and then he would have had the misfortune to find that money turn up missing. Bitter, bitter luck that the tools were ever brought there!

They resolved to keep a lookout for that Spaniard when he should come to town spying out for chances to do his revengeful job, and follow him to "Number Two," wherever that might be. Then a ghastly thought occurred to Tom.

"Revenge? What if he means us, Huck!"

"Oh, don't!" said Huck, nearly fainting.

They talked it all over, and as they entered town they agreed to believe that he might possibly mean somebody else -- at least that he might at least mean nobody but Tom, since only Tom had testified.

Very, very small comfort it was to Tom to be alone in danger! Company would be a palpable improvement, he thought.

明明白白读英语 轻轻松松记单词

You can memorize words in an efficient way if you pronounce them reasonably. Say words correctly, and you will learn them easily. Correct pronunciation means correct spelling of the words. English spelling is not good to guide its pronunciation. But spelling and pronunciation have closed relationship. They match each other perfectly. Sometimes we can pronounce a word according to its spelling. English pronunciation can also guide its spelling. This is a two-way communication.
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第26章 真正的强盗找到了一箱金子

第二天大约在中午,这两个孩子到那棵枯树前来拿工具。汤姆急不可耐地要到那个闹鬼的屋子去;显然哈克也想去,可却突然说:“喂,我说汤姆,你知道今天是什么日子?”

汤姆脑子转了转,合计着日子,接着迅速地抬起眼睛,一副惊讶的表情。

“我的妈呀!哈克,我还没想到这一点呢!”

“哦,我也是的,不过,我刚才忽然想起今天是星期五。”(星期五是基督耶稣受难的日子,所以基督徒们认为它是个不吉利的日子。)

“真该死,哈克,得仔细点才行。我们在这个日子干这种事情,可能是自找麻烦。”

“你说可能。最好还是说一定!要是换成别的日子,说不定会有救,可是今天不成。”

“这连傻瓜都知道。不过,哈克,我想除你之外,还有别人明白这个理。”

“哼!我说过就我一人明白了吗?光星期五还不够。昨天夜里,我做了一个糟糕透顶的梦——梦见耗子了。”

“真是瞎胡闹!一准要倒霉了。它们打架了吗?”

“没有。”

“嗯,这还行。哈克,梦见耗子但没梦见它们打架,这说明要有麻烦事了。我们要特别、特别地小心,设法避开它就没事了,今天算了,去玩吧。哈克,你知道罗宾汉吗?”

“不知道。他是谁?”

“嘿,这你都不知道。他可是英国有史以来最伟大的人物之一,也是最好的一个。他是个强盗。”

“嗳哟,真了不起,我要也是就好了。他抢谁呢?”

“他劫富济贫,抢的都是郡长、主教、国王之类的富人。他不但不骚扰穷人,而且还跟他们平分抢来的东西。”

“嗯,他一定是个好汉。”

“那还用说,哈克。欧,他真了不起。我从来没见过这样高尚的人。我敢说现在没有这样的人了,我敢这么说。他一只手背在后面都能把任何人打倒。他要是拿起那把紫杉木弓,一英里半开外就能射中一角钱的分币,百发百中。”

“紫杉木弓是什么?”

“搞不清,就是一种弓吧。他如果没有打到十环的水平,那坐下来就哭——还要咒骂。得了,我们来演罗宾汉吧,它好玩极了。我来教你。”

“好的。”

他俩玩了一下午的罗宾汉游戏,边玩边忍不住不时地朝那座闹鬼的房子看上一两眼,三言两语地议论着第二天到那里去会发生的情况。太阳西沉时,他俩顺着长长的树影往家走去,不久就消失在卡第夫山的树林中。

星期六中午刚过不久,两个孩子又来到那棵死树旁。他俩先在树荫下抽了一会烟,聊了几句,然后又在剩下的一个洞里继续挖了几锹。当然这样做并非出于抱有多大的希望,只是因为汤姆说过有许多回挖宝的人离宝只有六寸,结果还是让别的人一锹就给挖走了。不过,这一次他俩没那么幸运,于是他们就扛起工具走了,他们很看重财宝,而且就挖宝而言,他们已尽了最大的努力。

片刻之后,他俩熟悉了这个地方,不再像刚进来时那样害怕了。于是,他们仔仔细细地审视了一番,既惊奇又十分佩服自己的胆量。接着,他们想上楼看看,这似乎是有点背水一战的意味,他俩得相互壮胆,于是他们把手中的家伙扔到墙角就上了楼。楼上的情景与楼下的一样破落。他们很快发现墙角处有个壁橱,好像里面有点看头,可结果是一无所有。这时的他们胆子大多了,勇气十足。正当他俩准备下楼动手时——

“嘘!”汤姆说。

“怎么回事?”哈克脸色吓得发白,悄悄地问道。

“嘘!……那边……你听见了吗?”

“听见了!……哦,天啊!我们快逃吧!”

“安静!别动!他们正朝门这边走来。”

两个孩子趴在楼板上,眼睛盯着木节孔,在等着,恐惧得要命。

“他们停下了。……不——又过来了……来了。哈克,别再出声,天哪,我要是不在这里就好了!”

进来了两个男人,两个孩子都低低自语道:“一个是那个又聋又哑的西班牙老头,近来在镇上露过一两次面,另一个是陌生人。”

“另一个人”衣衫褴褛,蓬头垢面,脸上表情令人难受;西班牙老头披一条墨西哥花围巾,脸上长着密密麻麻的白色络腮胡,头戴宽边帽,长长的白发垂下,鼻子上架一副绿眼镜。进屋后,“另一个人”低声说着什么,两人面对门,背朝墙,坐在地板上,“另一个人”继续说着,神情也不太紧张了,话也越来越清楚:“不行,”他说,“我反复琢磨,我还是不想干,这事太危险。”

“危险!”那又聋又哑的西班牙人咕哝着说,“没出息!”两个孩子见此大吃一惊。

这个声音吓得两个孩子喘不过气来,直发抖,是印第安·乔的声音!沉默了一会,乔说:“我们在上面干的事够危险,

可并没有出差错。”

“那可不一样,那是在河上面,离得又很远,附近没有人家,我们试了没干成,这不会有人知道。”

“再说,哪里还有比大白天来这儿更危险的事呢?——谁看见都会起疑心。”

“这我知道。可是干了那傻事后,没有比这更方便的地方了。我也要离开这烂房子。昨天就想走,可是那两个可恶的小子在山上玩,他们看这里一清二楚,想溜是不可能的。”

“那两个可恶的小子”一听就明白了,因此抖个不停;想到他们等到周六再行动,觉得真是幸运,心里想,就是已等了一年,也心甘情愿。

那两个男人拿出些食品作午饭,印第安·乔仔细沉思了许久,最后说:“喂,小伙子,你回到你该去的河上面那边去,

等我的消息。我要进一趟城,去探探风声。等我觉得平安无事时,我们再去干那件危险的事情。完事就一起到得克萨斯州去!”

这倒令人满意,两人随即打了个呵欠,印第安·乔说:

“我困得要命!该轮到你望风了。”

他蜷着身子躺在草上,不一会儿就打起鼾来,同伴推了他一两次,他就不打鼾了。不久望风的也打起瞌睡,头越来越低,俩人呼呼打起鼾来。

两个孩子深深地吸了口气,真是谢天谢地。汤姆低声说:

“机会来了——快点!”

哈克说:“不行,要是他们醒来,我非死不可。”

汤姆催他走——哈克老是不敢动。结果汤姆慢慢站起身,轻轻地一人往外走。可他一迈步,那摇摇晃晃的破楼板就吱吱作响,吓得他立即趴下,像死了一样,他不敢再动一下,两个孩子躺在那里一分一秒地数着时间,似有度日如年之感,最后他俩觉得日子终于熬到了头,看到日落西山,心中充满感激之情。

这时有一人鼾声停了。印第安·乔坐起来,朝四周张望。同伴头垂到膝上,他冷冷地笑笑,用脚把他踹醒,然后对他说:

“喂,你就是这样望风的,幸亏没发生什么意外。”

“天哪,我睡过去了吗?”

“伙计,差不多,差不多,该开路了,剩下的那点油水怎么办?”

“像以前那样,把它留下,等往南方去的时候再捎上它。背着六百五十块银元走可不是件容易的事情。”

“好,再来一次也没什么关系。”

“不,得像以前一样,最好晚上来。”

“对,不过,干那事可能要等很长时间,弄不好会出差错,这地方并不绝对保险,我们干脆把它埋起来——埋得深深的。”

“说得妙,”同伴说道。他走到屋对面,膝盖顶地,取下一块后面的炉边石头,掏出一袋叮当响的袋子,自己拿出二三十美元,又给印第安·乔拿了那么多,然后把袋子递给乔,他正跪在角落边,用猎刀在挖东西。

两个孩子此刻把恐惧和不幸全抛到九霄云外。他们按住内心的喜悦,观察着他们的一举一动。运气!想都不敢想的好运气!六百块钱能让五六个孩子变成阔佬!真是找宝碰到好运气,不费吹灰之力,到那里一挖,准没错。他俩不时地同时彼此相互碰一碰,意思非常明了。“噢,现在你该高兴我们呆在这里是对的!”

乔的刀碰到了东西。

“喂!”他说。

“那是什么?”他的同伴问道。

“快要烂的木板——不,肯定是个箱子,帮帮忙,看看是作什么用的。不要紧,我已经把它给弄了个洞。”

他伸出手把箱子拽出来——

“伙计,是钱!”

两个男人仔细端详满手的钱币,是金币。上面的两个孩子也同他们一样地激动、高兴。

乔的同伴说:

“我们得快挖。我刚才看见壁炉那边拐角处的草堆中有把上锈的铁锹。”

他跑过去拿回两个孩子的工具:十字镐和铁锹,挑剔地看了一番,摇摇头,自言自语地咕哝了一两句,然后开始挖了起来。箱子很快被挖了出来,外面包着铁皮,不太大,经过岁月的侵蚀,现在没有以前牢固了。那两个男人对着宝箱,喜滋滋的,不言不语。

“伙计,箱子有一千块钱。”印第安·乔说道。“以前常听说,有年夏季莫列尔那帮人来过这一带活动,”陌生人说。

“这事我知道。”印第安·乔说,“我看,这倒有点像是那么回事。”

“现在你不用去干那活啦。”

混血儿皱起眉头。他说道:

“你不了解我,至少你不全知道那件事。那不完全是抢劫——那是复仇啊!”他眼里射出凶恶的光。“这事得你帮我,干完活就到得州去,回去看你老婆和孩子们,等我的消息。”

“好——如果是这样的,那么这箱金币怎么办?——再埋在这里?”

“对,(楼上高兴得欢天喜地。)不!好家伙!绝对不行!(楼上的情绪一落千丈。)我差点忘了,那把铁锹上还有新泥土呢!(两个孩子一听吓得要命。)这里要锹和镐头干什么?是谁拿来的?——人呢?听见有人吗?看见了吗?好家伙,还要把箱子埋起来,让他们回来好发现这里有人动过土?不行,这样不妥,我们把箱子拿到我那里去。”

“说得对呀,干吗不呢?早该想到这主意,你是说要拿到一号去?”

“不,是二号,十字架下面的,别的地方不行,没有特别的地方。”

“好,天快黑了,可以动身了。”

印第安·乔站起身来,在窗户间来回走动,小心地观察着外面的动静,随即他说道:

“谁会把锹和镐头拿到这里呢?你说楼上会不会有人?”

两个孩子被吓得大气不敢喘。印第安·乔手上拿着刀,站在那里,有点犹豫不决,片刻后他转身朝楼梯口走去,孩子们想起了壁橱,可现在却一点力气都没有。

脚步声吱吱嘎嘎地响着,上了楼梯,情况万分危急,危难时刻两个孩子坚定了决心——他俩刚准备跑到壁橱里,就听见哗地一声,印第安·乔连人带朽木板一下子掉到地上烂楼梯木头堆里。他边骂边站起来,这时他同伴说:

“骂有什么用,要是有人在楼上,就让他呆在上面吧,没人在乎,他们要是现在跳下来找岔,没人反对,一刻钟后天就黑了,愿跟就让他们跟踪好了。我愿意。我想,把东西扔在这里的人,一定看见了我们,以为我们是鬼,我敢打赌他们还在逃跑。”

乔咕哝了一阵,然后觉得同伴说得有道理,乘天黑之前,抓紧时间,收拾收拾东西好离开。随后他俩在渐渐沉下来的暮色中溜出去,带着宝箱往河那边走去。

汤姆和哈克站起来,虽然很乏,但现在舒服多了,他俩从房子的木条缝中盯着那两个人的背影。跟踪他们?他俩不行,从屋上平安下来没有扭伤脖子,再翻过山顺着小路返回城中,已经是不错的事情了。他俩没再多说,只是一个劲地埋怨自己,怪运气不好,才把那倒霉的锹和镐头带到这儿来。要不是这两样工具,印第安·乔决不会起疑心。他会把装金币的箱子藏在这里,然后去报仇,等回来后会伤心地发现东西不翼而飞。怎么想起来把工具带到这儿来呢,真是该死,倒霉透顶!

他们打定主意,等那个西班牙人进城刺探、伺机报仇时,一定要盯梢他,跟他到“二号”去,管他上天入地都要跟去。

突然一个可怕的念头出现在汤姆的脑海里。

“报仇?哈克,要是他们指的是我俩,那可怎么办?”

“噢,别讲了。”哈克说着,差点昏过去。

他俩仔细商量了一番,进城后权当他指的是另外的人,至少是指汤姆,因为只有汤姆在法庭上作过证。

汤姆一人陷入危险,确实让他感到不安,很有点不安。他想,要是有个同伴,多少要好受些。

The Adverntures of Tom Sawyer Chapter1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

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