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The Adverntures of Tom Sawyer Chapter1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

Respectable Huck Joins the Gang
(Chapter 35)

THE reader may rest satisfied that Tom's and Huck's windfall made a mighty stir in the poor little village of St. Petersburg. So vast a sum, all in actual cash, seemed next to incredible. It was talked about, gloated over, glorified, until the reason of many of the citizens tottered under the strain of the unhealthy excitement. Every "haunted" house in St. Petersburg and the neighboring villages was dissected, plank by plank, and its foundations dug up and ransacked for hidden treasure -- and not by boys, but men – pretty grave, unromantic men, too, some of them. Wherever Tom and Huck appeared they were courted, admired, stared at. The boys were not able to remember that their remarks had possessed weight before; but now their sayings were treasured and repeated; everything they did seemed somehow to be regarded as remarkable; they had evidently lost the power of doing and saying commonplace things; moreover, their past history was raked up and discovered to bear marks of conspicuous originality. The village paper published biographical sketches of the boys.

The Widow Douglas put Huck's money out at six per cent., and Judge Thatcher did the same with Tom's at Aunt Polly's request. Each lad had an income, now, that was simply prodigious -- a dollar for every week-day in the year and half of the Sundays. It was just what the minister got -- no, it was what he was promised -- he generally couldn't collect it. A dollar and a quarter a week would board, lodge, and school a boy in those old simple days -- and clothe him and wash him, too, for that matter.

Judge Thatcher had conceived a great opinion of Tom. He said that no commonplace boy would ever have got his daughter out of the cave. When Becky told her father, in strict confidence, how Tom had taken her whipping at school, the Judge was visibly moved; and when she pleaded grace for the mighty lie which Tom had told in order to shift that whipping from her shoulders to his own, the Judge said with a fine outburst that it was a noble, a generous, a magnanimous lie -- a lie that was worthy to hold up its head and march down through history breast to breast with George Washington's lauded Truth about the hatchet! Becky thought her father had never looked so tall and so superb as when he walked the floor and stamped his foot and said that. She went straight off and told Tom about it.

Judge Thatcher hoped to see Tom a great lawyer or a great soldier some day. He said he meant to look to it that Tom should be admitted to the National Military Academy and afterward trained in the best law school in the country, in order that he might be ready for either career or both.

Huck Finn's wealth and the fact that he was now under the Widow Douglas' protection introduced him into society -- no, dragged him into it, hurled him into it -- and his sufferings were almost more than he could bear. The widow's servants kept him clean and neat, combed and brushed, and they bedded him nightly in unsympathetic sheets that had not one little spot or stain which he could press to his heart and know for a friend. He had to eat with a knife and fork; he had to use napkin, cup, and plate; he had to learn his book, he had to go to church; he had to talk so properly that speech was become insipid in his mouth; whithersoever he turned, the bars and shackles of civilization shut him in and bound him hand and foot.

He bravely bore his miseries three weeks, and then one day turned up missing. For forty-eight hours the widow hunted for him everywhere in great distress. The public were profoundly concerned; they searched high and low, they dragged the river for his body. Early the third morning Tom Sawyer wisely went poking among some old empty hogsheads down behind the abandoned slaughter-house, and in one of them he found the refugee. Huck had slept there; he had just breakfasted upon some stolen odds and ends of food, and was lying off, now, in comfort, with his pipe. He was unkempt, uncombed, and clad in the same old ruin of rags that had made him picturesque in the days when he was free and happy. Tom routed him out, told him the trouble he had been causing, and urged him to go home. Huck's face lost its tranquil content, and took a melancholy cast. He said:

"Don't talk about it, Tom. I've tried it, and it don't work; it don't work, Tom. It ain't for me; I ain't used to it. The widder's good to me, and friendly; but I can't stand them ways. She makes me get up just at the same time every morning; she makes me wash, they comb me all to thunder; she won't let me sleep in the woodshed; I got to wear them blamed clothes that just smothers me, Tom; they don't seem to any air git through 'em, somehow; and they're so rotten nice that I can't set down, nor lay down, nor roll around anywher's; I hain't slid on a cellar-door for -- well, it 'pears to be years; I got to go to church and sweat and sweat -- I hate them ornery sermons! I can't ketch a fly in there, I can't chaw. I got to wear shoes all Sunday. The widder eats by a bell; she goes to bed by a bell; she gits up by a bell -- everything's so awful reg'lar a body can't stand it."

"Well, everybody does that way, Huck."

"Tom, it don't make no difference. I ain't everybody, and I can't stand it. It's awful to be tied up so. And grub comes too easy – I don't take no interest in vittles, that way. I got to ask to go a-fishing; I got to ask to go in a-swimming -- dern'd if I hain't got to ask to do everything. Well, I'd got to talk so nice it wasn't no comfort -- I'd got to go up in the attic and rip out awhile, every day, to git a taste in my mouth, or I'd a died, Tom. The widder wouldn't let me smoke; she wouldn't let me yell, she wouldn't let me gape, nor stretch, nor scratch, before folks --" [Then with a spasm of special irritation and injury] -- "And dad fetch it, she prayed all the time! I never see such a woman! I HAD to shove, Tom -- I just had to. And besides, that school's going to open, and I'd a had to go to it -- well, I wouldn't stand THAT, Tom. Looky-here, Tom, being rich ain't what it's cracked up to be. It's just worry and worry, and sweat and sweat, and a-wishing you was dead all the time. Now these clothes suits me, and this bar'l suits me, and I ain't ever going to shake 'em any more. Tom, I wouldn't ever got into all this trouble if it hadn't 'a' ben for that money; now you just take my sheer of it along with your'n, and gimme a ten-center sometimes -- not many times, becuz I don't give a dern for a thing 'thout it's tollable hard to git -- and you go and beg off for me with the widder."

"Oh, Huck, you know I can't do that. 'Tain't fair; and besides if you'll try this thing just a while longer you'll come to like it."

"Like it! Yes -- the way I'd like a hot stove if I was to set on it long enough. No, Tom, I won't be rich, and I won't live in them cussed smothery houses. I like the woods, and the river, and hogsheads, and I'll stick to 'em, too. Blame it all! just as we'd got guns, and a cave, and all just fixed to rob, here this dern foolishness has got to come up and spile it all!"

Tom saw his opportunity --

"Lookyhere, Huck, being rich ain't going to keep me back from turning robber."

"No! Oh, good-licks; are you in real dead-wood earnest, Tom?"

"Just as dead earnest as I'm sitting here. But Huck, we can't let you into the gang if you ain't respectable, you know."

Huck's joy was quenched.

"Can't let me in, Tom? Didn't you let me go for a pirate?"

"Yes, but that's different. A robber is more high-toned than what a pirate is -- as a general thing. In most countries they're awful high up in the nobility -- dukes and such."

"Now, Tom, hain't you always ben friendly to me? You wouldn't shet me out, would you, Tom? You wouldn't do that, now, would you, Tom?"

"Huck, I wouldn't want to, and I don't want to -- but what would people say? Why, they'd say, 'Mph! Tom Sawyer's Gang! Pretty low characters in it!' They'd mean you, Huck. You wouldn't like that, and I wouldn't."

Huck was silent for some time, engaged in a mental struggle. Finally he said:

"Well, I'll go back to the widder for a month and tackle it and see if I can come to stand it, if you'll let me b'long to the gang, Tom."

"All right, Huck, it's a whiz! Come along, old chap, and I'll ask the widow to let up on you a little, Huck."

"Will you, Tom -- now will you? That's good. If she'll let up on some of the roughest things, I'll smoke private and cuss private, and crowd through or bust. When you going to start the gang and turn robbers?"

"Oh, right off. We'll get the boys together and have the initiation to-night, maybe."

"Have the which?"

"Have the initiation."

"What's that?"

"It's to swear to stand by one another, and never tell the gang's secrets, even if you're chopped all to flinders, and kill anybody and all his family that hurts one of the gang."

"That's gay -- that's mighty gay, Tom, I tell you."

"Well, I bet it is. And all that swearing's got to be done at midnight, in the lonesomest, awfulest place you can find -- a ha'nted house is the best, but they're all ripped up now."

"Well, midnight's good, anyway, Tom."

"Yes, so it is. And you've got to swear on a coffin, and sign it with blood."

"Now, that's something like! Why, it's a million times bullier than pirating. I'll stick to the widder till I rot, Tom; and if I git to be a reg'lar ripper of a robber, and everybody talking 'bout it, I reckon she'll be proud she snaked me in out of the wet."

CONCLUSION

SO endeth this chronicle. It being strictly a history of a boy, it must stop here; the story could not go much further without becoming the history of a man. When one writes a novel about grown people, he knows exactly where to stop -- that is, with a marriage; but when he writes of juveniles, he must stop where he best can.

Most of the characters that perform in this book still live, and are prosperous and happy. Some day it may seem worth while to take up the story of the younger ones again and see what sort of men and women they turned out to be; therefore it will be wisest not to reveal any of that part of their lives at present.

明明白白读英语 轻轻松松记单词

You can memorize words in an efficient way if you pronounce them reasonably. Say words correctly, and you will learn them easily. Correct pronunciation means correct spelling of the words. English spelling is not good to guide its pronunciation. But spelling and pronunciation have closed relationship. They match each other perfectly. Sometimes we can pronounce a word according to its spelling. English pronunciation can also guide its spelling. This is a two-way communication.
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第35章 受人尊敬的哈克与“强盗”为伍

汤姆和哈克两人意外地发了横财,这下轰动了圣彼得堡这个穷乡僻壤的小村镇。读者读到这里可以松口气了。钱数多不说,又全是现金,真让人难以置信。到处的人们都在谈论此事,对他表示羡慕,称赞不已,后来有人因为过份激动,结果被弄得神魂颠倒。现在,圣彼得堡镇上每间闹鬼的屋子都被掘地三尺,木板被一块块拆掉,为的是找财宝——而且这一切全是大人们的所为,其中一部分人干得十分起劲和认真。汤姆和哈克两人无论走到哪里,人们都巴结他俩,有的表示羡慕,有的睁大眼睛观看。两个孩子记不得以前他们说话在人们心目中是否有份量,再现在大不一样。他们无论说什么,人们都看得很宝贵,到处重复他俩的话。就连他们的一举一动都被认为意义重大。显然,他俩已失去了作为普通人的资格,更有甚者,有人收集了他俩过去的资料,说以前他俩就超凡不俗。村里的报纸还刊登了两个小孩的小传。

道格拉斯寡妇把哈克的钱拿出去按六分利息放债,波莉姨妈委托撒切尔法官以同样利息把汤姆的钱也拿出去放债。现在每个孩子都有一笔数目惊人的收入。平常日子以及半数的星期日,他俩每天都有一块大洋的收入。这笔钱相当一个牧师的全年收入——不,准确地说,牧师拿不到那些,只是上面先给他们开张空头支票而已。那时,生活费用低,1元2角5分钱就够一个孩子上学、膳宿的费用,连穿衣、洗澡等都包括在内。

撒切尔法官十分器重汤姆,他说汤姆绝不是个平庸的孩子,否则他不会救出他的女儿。听到贝基悄悄地告诉他,汤姆在校曾替她受过,挨过鞭笞时,法官显然被感动了。她请求父亲原谅汤姆。汤姆撒了个大谎主要是为了替她挨鞭笞,法官情绪激动,大声说,那个谎是高尚的,它是慷慨、宽宏大量的谎话。它完全有资格,昂首阔步,永垂青史,与华盛顿那句曾大受赞扬的关于斧头的老实话①争光!贝基见父亲踏着地板,跺着脚说这句话时显得十分伟大了不起,她以前从没见过父亲是这个样子。她直接跑去找到汤姆,把这事告诉了他。

   ①据说华盛顿总统小时候用父亲给他的小斧子曾把一棵樱桃树砍掉,当父亲追问时,他不怕受罚,诚实地承认了自己的过错。

撒切尔法官希望汤姆以后成为一名大律师或是著名的军人。他说他打算安排汤姆进国家军事学院,然后再到最好的法学院接受教育,这样将来随便当律师、做军人或是身兼两职都行。

哈克·费恩有了钱,又归道格拉斯寡妇监护,这样他踏入了社交圈子——不对,他是被拖进去,被扔进去的——于是他苦不堪言。寡妇的佣人帮他又梳又刷,把他收拾得干干净净,每晚又为他换上冷冰冰的床单。哈克想在上面找个小黑点按在心口做朋友都找不到。他吃饭得用刀叉,还要使餐巾、杯子和碟子;他又得念书,上教堂。说话枯燥无味没关系,但谈吐要斯文,他无论走到那里,文明都束缚着他的手脚。

就这样,他硬着头皮忍受着,过了三个星期。突然有一天他不见了。寡妇急得要命,四处去找他,找了整整有两天两夜。众人们也十分关注此事,他们到处搜索,有的还到河里去打捞。第三天一大早,汤姆挺聪明,在破旧的屠宰场后面的几只旧空桶中找人,结果在一只空桶中发现了哈克,他就在这过夜。哈克刚吃完早饭,吃的全是偷来的剩饭菜。他抽着烟斗,正舒服地躺在那里休息。他邋遢不堪,蓬头垢面,穿着往日快快活活时那套有趣的烂衣服。汤姆把他撵出来,告诉他已惹了麻烦,要他快回家。哈克脸上悠然自得的神情消失了,马上呈现出一脸的愁相。他说:

“汤姆,别提那事了,我已经试过了,那没有用,没用,汤姆。那种生活不适合我过,我不习惯。寡妇待我好,够处,可是我受不了那一套。她每天早晨叫我按时起床;她叫我洗脸;他们还给我使劲地梳;她不让我在柴棚里睡觉。汤姆,我得穿那种倒霉的衣服,紧绷绷的,有点不透气。衣服很漂亮,弄得我站也不是,坐也不行,更不能到处打滚。我已经很长时间没有到过别人家的地窖里,也许有许多年了。我还得去做礼拜,弄得浑身是汗——我恨那些一文不值的布道辞!在那里我既不能捉苍蝇,也不能嚼口香糖,星期日整天不能赤脚。吃饭、上床睡觉、起床等寡妇都要按铃,总而言之,一切都井然有序,真让人受不了。”

“不过,哈克,大家都是这样的。”

“汤姆,你说得没错,不过我不是大家,我受不了,捆得那样紧真让人受不了。还有,不费劲就能搞到吃的东西,我不喜欢这种吃法,就是要钓鱼也得先征求寡妇的同意,去游个泳也得先问问她,真他妈的,干什么事都要先问她才行。说话也得斯文,真不习惯——我只好跑到阁楼顶上胡乱放它一通,这样嘴里才有滋味,否则真不如死了算,汤姆。寡妇不让我抽烟,不让我在人前大声讲话,或大喊大叫,还不许我伸懒腰,抓痒痒——”(接着他显得十分烦躁和委屈的样子。)

“还有呢,她整天祈祷个没完!我从来也没见过她这样的女人。

我得溜走,汤姆——不溜不行呀,况且,学校快要开学了,不跑就得上学,那怎么能受得了呢。汤姆?喂,汤姆,发了横财并不像人们说得那样是个非常愉快的事情。发财简直就是发愁,受罪,最后弄得你真希望不如一死了之。这儿的衣服我穿合适,在桶里睡觉也不错,我再不打算离开这儿。汤姆,要不是那些钱,我根本不会有这么多的麻烦事情,现在,你把我那份钱也拿去,偶尔给我毛把钱用就行了,不要常给,因为我觉得容易得到的东西并没有什么大价值。请你到寡妇那儿为我告辞吧。”

“噢,哈克,你知道,我不能这样做,这不太好。你如果稍微多试几天,就会喜欢那种生活的。”

“喜欢那种生活——就像喜欢很长时间坐在热炉子上一样。我不干,汤姆,我不要当富人,也不想住在那闷热倒霉的房子里。我喜欢森林、河流、那些大桶,我决不离开这些东西。真是倒霉,刚弄了几条枪,找到了山洞,准备去当强盗,却偏偏碰上了这种事情,真让人扫兴。”

汤姆瞅到了机会——

“喂,哈克,富了也能当强盗啊。”

“真的吗?你说话当真,汤姆?”

“当然当真,就像我人坐在这儿一样,千真万确。不过,我们不接受不体面的人入伙,哈克。”

哈克的高兴劲被一下子打消了。

“不让我入伙,汤姆?你不是让我当过海盗吗?”

“是让你当过,不过这跟入伙没什么关系,总的说来,强盗比海盗格调要高。在许多国家,强盗算是上流人当中的上流人,都是些公爵之类的人。”

“汤姆,你一直对我很好,不是吗?你不会不让我入伍,对吧,汤姆?不会不让我入伍吧,汤姆,是不是?”

“哈克,我不愿不让你入伍,也不想那么干,不过要是让你进来,别人会怎么说呢?他们会不屑一顾地说:瞧汤姆·索亚那帮乌合之众,全是些低贱的人。这是指你的,哈克。你不会喜欢他们这么说你,我也不喜欢。”

哈克沉默了一会,思想上在作激烈的斗争。最后他开了腔:

“得,我再回到寡妇家里应付上一个月,看能不能适应那种生活,不过汤姆,你会让我入伍,对吧?”

“好吧,哈克,一言为定!走,老伙计,我去跟寡妇讲,让她对你要求松一些。”

“你答应了,汤姆?你答应了,这太好了。在些难事上,她要是能宽容一些,我就可以背地里抽烟、诅咒。要么挺过去,要么完蛋拉倒。你打算什么时候结伙当强盗?”

“噢,这就干。把孩子们集中起来,也许今晚就举行入伙仪式。”

“举行什么?”

“举行入伙仪式。”

“什么叫入伙仪式?”

“就是发誓互相帮忙,永不泄密。就是被剁成肉酱也不能泄密。如果有人伤害了你,就把他和他全家统统干掉,一个不留。”

“这真好玩,真有意思,汤姆。”

“对,我想是好玩。发誓仪式得在半夜举行,要选在最偏僻、最恐怖的地方干。闹鬼的房子最好,可现在全被拆了。”

“半夜时分干还是不错的,汤姆。”

“对。还要对棺材发誓,咬破指头签名呐。”

“这才真有点像样呢!这比当海盗要强一万倍。汤姆,我到死都跟着寡妇在一起了。我要是始终能成为一名响当当的强盗,人人都会谈到我,那么,我想,她会为自己把我从困境中解救出来而自豪。”

结束语

故事至此结束。因为这确实是个儿童的故事,所以写到这里必须搁笔,再写下去就得涉及到成人时期。写成人的故事,作者很清楚写到结婚成家就算了事,但是写青少年则得见好就收。

本书中的人物有许多仍然健在,过着富裕快乐的生活。有朝一日再来续写这个故事,看看原来书中的小孩子们长大后做什么,这也许是件值得做的事情。正因为如此,明智的做法就是现在不要越俎代庖。

The Adverntures of Tom Sawyer Chapter1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

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《英语单词拼读规则表》历年不同版本(背面)

2005年版《英语单词拼读规则表导读》

2007年版《英语单词拼读规则表导读》

语文音像版《英语单词拼读规则》及DVD教学光盘

《英语单词拼读规则》(安师大版)

网友们经常提及的问题
《英语单词拼读规则》
字符概念的引入
单词注音方法推荐
对英语单词可拼读性的认识
辅音字母双写的含义
字符的不可分割性
记忆英语单词的三种境界
26个字母出现频率排顺序
字符的“名称”与“读音”
判断单词读音的三个步骤
关于ia io iu 及三元音
拼读与音析
长音与短音
字符 元字符 单元字符
复元字符
辅字符 单辅字符
复辅字符
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