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The Adverntures of Tom Sawyer Chapter1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

Huck Saves the Widow
(Chapter 29)

THE first thing Tom heard on Friday morning was a glad piece of news — Judge Thatcher's family had come back to town the night before. Both Injun Joe and the treasure sunk into secondary importance for a moment, and Becky took the chief place in the boy's interest. He saw her and they had an exhausting good time playing "hi-spy" and "gully-keeper" with a crowd of their schoolmates. The day was completed and crowned in a peculiarly satisfactory way: Becky teased her mother to appoint the next day for the long-promised and long-delayed picnic, and she consented. The child's delight was boundless; and Tom's not more moderate. The invitations were sent out before sunset, and straightway the young folks of the village were thrown into a fever of preparation and pleasurable anticipation. Tom's excitement enabled him to keep awake until a pretty late hour, and he had good hopes of hearing Huck's "maow," and of having his treasure to astonish Becky and the picnickers with, next day; but he was disappointed. No signal came that night.

Morning came, eventually, and by ten or eleven o'clock a giddy and rollicking company were gathered at Judge Thatcher's, and everything was ready for a start. It was not the custom for elderly people to mar the picnics with their presence. The children were considered safe enough under the wings of a few young ladies of eighteen and a few young gentlemen of twenty-three or thereabouts. The old steam ferry-boat was chartered for the occasion; presently the gay throng filed up the main street laden with provision-baskets. Sid was sick and had to miss the fun; Mary remained at home to entertain him. The last thing Mrs. Thatcher said to Becky, was:

"You'll not get back till late. Perhaps you'd better stay all night with some of the girls that live near the ferry-landing, child."

"Then I'll stay with Susy Harper, mamma."

"Very well. And mind and behave yourself and don't be any trouble."

Presently, as they tripped along, Tom said to Becky:

"Say -- I'll tell you what we'll do. 'Stead of going to Joe Harper's we'll climb right up the hill and stop at the Widow Douglas'. She'll have ice-cream! She has it most every day -- dead loads of it. And she'll be awful glad to have us."

"Oh, that will be fun!"

Then Becky reflected a moment and said:

"But what will mamma say?"

"How'll she ever know?"

The girl turned the idea over in her mind, and said reluctantly:

"I reckon it's wrong -- but --"

"But shucks! Your mother won't know, and so what's the harm? All she wants is that you'll be safe; and I bet you she'd 'a' said go there if she'd 'a' thought of it. I know she would!"

The Widow Douglas' splendid hospitality was a tempting bait. It and Tom's persuasions presently carried the day. So it was decided to say nothing anybody about the night's programme. Presently it occurred to Tom that maybe Huck might come this very night and give the signal. The thought took a deal of the spirit out of his anticipations. Still he could not bear to give up the fun at Widow Douglas'. And why should he give it up, he reasoned -- the signal did not come the night before, so why should it be any more likely to come to-night? The sure fun of the evening outweighed the uncertain treasure; and, boy-like, he determined to yield to the stronger inclination and not allow himself to think of the box of money another time that day.

Three miles below town the ferryboat stopped at the mouth of a woody hollow and tied up. The crowd swarmed ashore and soon the forest distances and craggy heights echoed far and near with shoutings and laughter. All the different ways of getting hot and tired were gone through with, and by-and-by the rovers straggled back to camp fortified with responsible appetites, and then the destruction of the good things began. After the feast there was a refreshing season of rest and chat in the shade of spreading oaks. By-and-by somebody shouted:

"Who's ready for the cave?"

Everybody was. Bundles of candles were procured, and straightway there was a general scamper up the hill. The mouth of the cave was up the hillside -- an opening shaped like a letter A. Its massive oaken door stood unbarred. Within was a small chamber, chilly as an ice-house, and walled by Nature with solid limestone that was dewy with a cold sweat. It was romantic and mysterious to stand here in the deep gloom and look out upon the green valley shining in the sun. But the impressiveness of the situation quickly wore off, and the romping began again. The moment a candle was lighted there was a general rush upon the owner of it; a struggle and a gallant defence followed, but the candle was soon knocked down or blown out, and then there was a glad clamor of laughter and a new chase. But all things have an end. By-and-by the procession went filing down the steep descent of the main avenue, the flickering rank of lights dimly revealing the lofty walls of rock almost to their point of junction sixty feet overhead. This main avenue was not more than eight or ten feet wide. Every few steps other lofty and still narrower crevices branched from it on either hand -- for McDougal's cave was but a vast labyrinth of crooked aisles that ran into each other and out again and led nowhere. It was said that one might wander days and nights together through its intricate tangle of rifts and chasms, and never find the end of the cave; and that he might go down, and down, and still down, into the earth, and it was just the same -- labyrinth under labyrinth, and no end to any of them. No man "knew" the cave. That was an impossible thing. Most of the young men knew a portion of it, and it was not customary to venture much beyond this known portion. Tom Sawyer knew as much of the cave as any one.

The procession moved along the main avenue some three-quarters of a mile, and then groups and couples began to slip aside into branch avenues, fly along the dismal corridors, and take each other by surprise at points where the corridors joined again. Parties were able to elude each other for the space of half an hour without going beyond the "known" ground.

By-and-by, one group after another came straggling back to the mouth of the cave, panting, hilarious, smeared from head to foot with tallow drippings, daubed with clay, and entirely delighted with the success of the day. Then they were astonished to find that they had been taking no note of time and that night was about at hand. The clanging bell had been calling for half an hour. However, this sort of close to the day's adventures was romantic and therefore satisfactory. When the ferryboat with her wild freight pushed into the stream, nobody cared sixpence for the wasted time but the captain of the craft.

Huck was already upon his watch when the ferry-boat's lights went glinting past the wharf. He heard no noise on board, for the young people were as subdued and still as people usually are who are nearly tired to death. He wondered what boat it was, and why she did not stop at the wharf -- and then he dropped her out of his mind and put his attention upon his business. The night was growing cloudy and dark. Ten o'clock came, and the noise of vehicles ceased, scattered lights began to wink out, all straggling foot-passengers disappeared, the village betook itself to its slumbers and left the small watcher alone with the silence and the ghosts. Eleven o'clock came, and the tavern lights were put out; darkness everywhere, now. Huck waited what seemed a weary long time, but nothing happened. His faith was weakening. Was there any use? Was there really any use? Why not give it up and turn in?

A noise fell upon his ear. He was all attention in an instant. The alley door closed softly. He sprang to the corner of the brick store. The next moment two men brushed by him, and one seemed to have something under his arm. It must be that box! So they were going to remove the treasure. Why call Tom now? It would be absurd -- the men would get away with the box and never be found again. No, he would stick to their wake and follow them; he would trust to the darkness for security from discovery. So communing with himself, Huck stepped out and glided along behind the men, cat-like, with bare feet, allowing them to keep just far enough ahead not to be invisible.

They moved up the river street three blocks, then turned to the left up a cross-street. They went straight ahead, then, until they came to the path that led up Cardiff Hill; this they took. They passed by the old Welshman's house, half-way up the hill, without hesitating, and still climbed upward. Good, thought Huck, they will bury it in the old quarry. But they never stopped at the quarry. They passed on, up the summit. They plunged into the narrow path between the tall sumach bushes, and were at once hidden in the gloom. Huck closed up and shortened his distance, now, for they would never be able to see him. He trotted along awhile; then slackened his pace, fearing he was gaining too fast; moved on a piece, then stopped altogether; listened; no sound; none, save that he seemed to hear the beating of his own heart. The hooting of an owl came over the hill -- ominous sound! But no footsteps. Heavens, was everything lost! He was about to spring with winged feet, when a man cleared his throat not four feet from him! Huck's heart shot into his throat, but he swallowed it again; and then he stood there shaking as if a dozen agues had taken charge of him at once, and so weak that he thought he must surely fall to the ground. He knew where he was. He knew he was within five steps of the stile leading into Widow Douglas' grounds. Very well, he thought, let them bury it there; it won't be hard to find.

Now there was a voice -- a very low voice -- Injun Joe's:

"Damn her, maybe she's got company -- there's lights, late as it is."

"I can't see any."

This was that stranger's voice -- the stranger of the haunted house. A deadly chill went to Huck's heart -- this, then, was the "revenge" job! His thought was, to fly. Then he remembered that the Widow Douglas had been kind to him more than once, and maybe these men were going to murder her. He wished he dared venture to warn her; but he knew he didn't dare -- they might come and catch him. He thought all this and more in the moment that elapsed between the stranger's remark and Injun Joe's next -- which was --

"Because the bush is in your way. Now -- this way -- now you see, don't you?"

"Yes. Well, there IS company there, I reckon. Better give it up."

"Give it up, and I just leaving this country forever! Give it up and maybe never have another chance. I tell you again, as I've told you before, I don't care for her swag -- you may have it. But her husband was rough on me -- many times he was rough on me -- and mainly he was the justice of the peace that jugged me for a vagrant. And that ain't all. It ain't a millionth part of it! He had me horsewhipped! -- horsewhipped in front of the jail, like a nigger! -- with all the town looking on! horsewhipped! -- do you understand? He took advantage of me and died. But I'll take it out of her."

"Oh, don't kill her! Don't do that!"

"Kill? Who said anything about killing? I would kill him if he was here; but not her. When you want to get revenge on a woman you don't kill her -- bosh! you go for her looks. You slit her nostrils -- you notch her ears like a sow!"

"By God, that's --"

"Keep your opinion to yourself! It will be safest for you. I'll tie her to the bed. If she bleeds to death, is that my fault? I'll not cry, if she does. My friend, you'll help me in this thing -- for my sake -- that's why you're here -- I mightn't be able alone. If you flinch, I'll kill you. Do you understand that? And if I have to kill you, I'll kill her -- and then I reckon nobody'll ever know much about who done this business."

"Well, if it's got to be done, let's get at it. The quicker the better -- I'm all in a shiver."

"Do it now? And company there? Look here -- I'll get suspicious of you, first thing you know. No -- we'll wait till the lights are out -- there's no hurry."

Huck felt that a silence was going to ensue -- a thing still more awful than any amount of murderous talk; so he held his breath and stepped gingerly back; planted his foot carefully and firmly, after balancing, one-legged, in a precarious way and almost toppling over, first on one side and then on the other. He took another step back, with the same elaboration and the same risks; then another and another, and -- a twig snapped under his foot! His breath stopped and he listened. There was no sound -- the stillness was perfect. His gratitude was measureless. Now he turned in his tracks, between the walls of sumach bushes -- turned himself as carefully as if he were a ship -- and then stepped quickly but cautiously along. When he emerged at the quarry he felt secure, and so he picked up his nimble heels and flew. Down, down he sped, till he reached the Welshman's. He banged at the door, and presently the heads of the old man and his two stalwart sons were thrust from windows.

"What's the row there? Who's banging? What do you want?"

"Let me in -- quick! I'll tell everything."

"Why, who are you?"

"Huckleberry Finn -- quick, let me in!"

"Huckleberry Finn, indeed! It ain't a name to open many doors, I judge! But let him in, lads, and let's see what's the trouble."

"Please don't ever tell I told you," were Huck's first words when he got in. "Please don't -- I'd be killed, sure -- but the widow's been good friends to me sometimes, and I want to tell -- I will tell if you'll promise you won't ever say it was me."

"By George, he has got something to tell, or he wouldn't act so!" exclaimed the old man; "out with it and nobody here'll ever tell, lad."

Three minutes later the old man and his sons, well armed, were up the hill, and just entering the sumach path on tiptoe, their weapons in their hands. Huck accompanied them no further. He hid behind a great bowlder and fell to listening. There was a lagging, anxious silence, and then all of a sudden there was an explosion of firearms and a cry.

Huck waited for no particulars. He sprang away and sped down the hill as fast as his legs could carry him.

明明白白读英语 轻轻松松记单词

You can memorize words in an efficient way if you pronounce them reasonably. Say words correctly, and you will learn them easily. Correct pronunciation means correct spelling of the words. English spelling is not good to guide its pronunciation. But spelling and pronunciation have closed relationship. They match each other perfectly. Sometimes we can pronounce a word according to its spelling. English pronunciation can also guide its spelling. This is a two-way communication.
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第29章 哈克静心守夜,寡妇幸免遭难

星期五早晨,汤姆听到的第一件事情是条好消息:撒切尔法官一家前天晚上又回到了城里。现在印第安·乔和那份财宝变得次要了,贝基吸引了这孩子的全部兴趣。他见到了她,俩人一起和一群同学捉迷藏,玩“守沟”游戏,痛快极了。这一天大家玩得特别痛快,另外还有一件事情特别令人愉快:贝基缠着她妈妈,要她答应第二天去野餐,因为她老早答应过的,可一直到现在都没有兑现。母亲同意了。孩子的欢乐无止无境,汤姆也大致如此,太阳没落山,请帖就送了出去,村里的年青人立即忙活起来,准备着,激动地等待着这一时刻的到来。汤姆也激动得很晚才睡着,他怀着极大的希望等着听哈克的“猫”叫,好在第二天野餐时拿出财宝给贝基和参加野餐的人一个惊喜,可他的如意算盘落了空,令他失望的是那天晚上根本没有任何“猫”叫声传来。早晨到了,10点、11点左右撒切尔法官家门口聚集了一群颠颠狂狂、闹闹哄哄的孩子们,全都准备好了就等出发。大人们照例不参加这样的野餐以免扫兴。因为有几个18岁的姑娘和23岁左右的小伙子加盟,所以孩子们在一起野餐不会出事的。这次他们租了那只老蒸汽渡船,随后欢乐的人群带着盛满吃的东西的篮子排着队走上大街。希德生病,没法和大家联欢,玛丽留在家中陪他玩。撒切尔夫人临走时最后对贝基说:

“孩子,要是很晚才回来,你不如到离码头很近的女孩家去住。”

“妈妈,那我就到苏珊·哈帕家去住。”

“行,到人家注意点,别调皮啊!”

他们走了,路上汤姆对贝基说:

“喂,告诉你,不要去乔·哈帕家,我们直接去爬山,到道格拉斯寡妇家歇脚。她有冰淇淋,几乎每天吃——多得不得了,我们去,她一准喜欢得要命。”

“噢,太有趣了!”

贝基又想了片刻后说:

“可不知妈妈会怎么想?”

“她不会知道的。”

她想了想,不情愿地说:

“我看这不好,不过……”

“不过个狗屁!你妈妈怎么知道?不会有事的。她只希望你平安无事,我敢打赌要是她想到这地方,一定早答应让你去了,我知道她会的!”

道格拉斯寡妇十分好客,弄得孩子们非常想去,再加上汤姆的巧言,事情终于这么定下来:他们不向任何人透露有关晚上的行动计划。汤姆又忽然想到哈克在今晚说不定会来,发出信号。想到这,他的劲头消了不少。更让他受不了的是放弃到道格拉斯寡妇家中去玩。为什么不去呢?他合计着——前天晚上没有信号,那么今晚怎么就偏偏可能有信号呢?财宝远在天边,而晚上的玩耍近在眼前。因此他决定大玩一场,等以后再抽时间去想宝箱的事情。

在离村镇三英里的地方,渡船在树木丛生的山谷口靠岸停泊。他们一窝蜂地涌上岸,不久树林中,高崖处到处都回荡着孩子们的欢歌笑语,什么能让他们汗流浃背,精疲力尽,他们就玩什么。渐渐地,那些乱跑的小家伙回到营地,味口大增,见到好吃的东西就饱餐一顿。饭后,他们在橡树荫下休息,边谈话边恢复体力,后来有人大喊:

“谁打算到洞里去玩?”

大家都准备去。一捆捆蜡烛拿了出来,大家立即欢快地开始爬山。洞口在山坡上——形状像大写的字母A。巨大的橡木门没上门闩,里边有个小室,寒气逼人,四周是天然的石灰岩墙壁,上面水珠晶莹透亮。站在这黑暗的地方,看着阳光下绿莹莹的山谷真是既浪漫,又神秘。很快大家忘却这里的美景,又嘻闹起来,蜡烛一点亮,有些人扑上去就抢走,随后就是一阵英勇的你争我夺的自卫反击战,要不了多久蜡烛要么被打翻,要么就被吹灭,接着大家发出一阵哄笑,又开始新的追逐。可是凡事都有个完,随后大家一个接一个顺着主要通道的陡坡往下走,那一排烛光照得高耸的石壁模模糊糊,烛光几乎能达到头顶上六十英尺两壁相连的地方。这条主通道宽不过八到十英尺,每隔几步两旁就有高耸而又狭窄的通口叉出去,——因为麦克道格拉斯山洞是个通道交错的大迷宫,不知通往何处,有人说你在这错综复杂的裂口和崖缝中一连走上几昼夜都找不到山洞的尽头;你尽可以一直往下走,往深处里去,大迷宫套小迷宫,一个也走不到头。没有人真正熟悉这个山洞。要熟悉它是不可能的事情。大多数年青人都知道一点,但习惯上没人敢再往里边多跑一点,汤姆·索亚和别的人一样也不过只知道一点而已。

他们一行人沿主通道大约走了四分之三英里,然后三三两两、成群结伴钻进了叉道,奔跑在阴森的长廊里,在拐弯的地方时常彼此相互偷袭。小队的人可以互相闪避,半个小时内不会迷路。

渐渐地,一组组的人零星地回到洞口,喘着气,乐滋滋的,从头到脚,都是蜡烛油,身上蹭满了泥土,完全沉浸在一天的快乐之中,这时他们吃惊地发现光顾着玩,没注意时间,天马上就要黑了。钟已噹噹地敲了半个小时,这样结束一天的探险活动很浪漫,因此大家很满意。当渡船载着兴高采烈的游客启锚时,除船老大外,没人有浪费时间的感觉。

渡船的灯光一摇一闪从码头边经过时,哈克已经开始守夜了。他没听见船上有什么声音,那群年青人现在不声不响,好像累得要命。哈克不知道这是条什么船,随后他不再想船的事,专心致志于守夜。晚上起了云,天色越来越暗,10点时,车辆的声音停止了,四处的灯火开始熄灭,行人也都散尽,整个村庄进入了梦乡,只有这个小家伙,独自一人空守寂寞,与魔鬼作伴。11点钟,客栈也熄了灯,现在到处一片漆黑。哈克等了很长一段时间,等得乏人,可仍无动静,他开始动摇了,还守在这里有什么用呢?真有用吗?不如回去睡觉算了。

突然他听到了动静。他立即全神贯注地听着,小巷的门轻轻关上。他连跑带跳来到砖厂拐弯的地方,这时两个男人从他身边一掠而过,其中一人腋下挟着件东西,一定是宝箱!他们是在转移财宝啊!现在不能叫汤姆,否则太傻了,那两个人会逃跑。一旦跑了再也不要指望能找到他们。对,他要盯着他俩,跟在后边走,靠夜色来掩护自己。哈克心里边合计着,边光着脚溜出去,像猫似的跟在那两人后头,离得不远不近,始终保持着能看见他们就行了。

他们顺着沿河的街道走了三个街区后,向左转上了十字街,然后径直往前来到通向卡第夫山的那条小路。他们又上了这条路,经过半山腰的威尔斯曼的老房子,仍一直往上爬。好吧,哈克心里想,他们会把宝箱埋在石坑里。可那两个人却经过老石坑,爬上了山顶他们一头钻进了茂密的漆树之间的一条小路,一下子就消失在黑暗中。哈克靠上去缩短了距离,因为那两人现在绝不会看见他。他小跑一阵,担心跑得太快;然后又放慢脚步,他向前走了一段路后,就停下来,听一听,没声音;除他呼呼的心跳声音外,什么也听不到。山那边传来猫头鹰的叫声——不祥的声音!可是却没有脚步声。老天啊,什么都不见了!他正想拔脚去追,这时不到四英尺的地方,有个男人在清嗓子。哈克的心一下子跳到嗓子眼,他强忍着,站在那里好像打摆子似的直抖,直抖得要摔倒在地上。他知道他在什么地方。现在他在离道格拉斯寡妇家庭院的阶梯口不到五步远的地方。这很好,就让他们在这里埋宝吧,这里找起来不难。

一个声音传来,很低很低,是印第安·乔的声音:

“他妈的,她家里也许有人——这么晚还亮着灯。”

“我看不到有什么灯亮。”

这是那个陌生人的声音——那个闹鬼的房子里的陌生人。哈克的心一阵冰凉——那么这就是复仇!他这时的念头就是一溜烟地逃掉,他突然想起道格拉斯寡妇不止一次地待他很好,这两个家伙说不定想谋害她呢?他真希望自己有胆量去向她报个信,可他晓得他不敢那样做,因为那两个家伙可能会来把他逮住。这一切都在他脑子里飞逝即过,一切都发生在那陌生人和印第安·乔谈话的间隙。接着乔说:

“树丛挡住了你的视线,往这边看——这下该看见灯光了吧,对不对?”

“是的,看见了。我觉得确实有外人在那里,最好别干了吧。”

“别干了,那怎么行,再说我就要离开这个国家,一去不回头,如果放弃这次行动,下次连机会都没有了,我再说一遍,以前已经跟你说过了,我根本不希罕她那几个小钱,你把钱拿去得了。可她丈夫对我太刻薄了——他多次是那样凶我——就因为他是治安官,说我是流氓,还不止这些,我说的还不到他对我干的一百万分之一多。他让人用马鞭抽我,像打黑人那样,就在监狱的前面抽我,让我在全镇人面前示众!挨马鞭抽,你懂吗?他死了,倒便宜了他,不过他欠我的我一定要从他女人这里得回来。”

“啊,可别杀死她!别那么干!”

“杀人!谁说过要杀人?要是他在,我真要杀了他,可不是弄死她。想报复女人,用不着要她的命——那太蠢了,你只要毁她的容就行,你扯开她的鼻孔,把耳朵弄个裂口,让她看上去像个猪。”

“天哪,那可是……”

“收起你的高见!这样对你最保险。我把她绑在床上,如果她因流血过多而一命呜呼,那能怪我吗?就是她死了,我也不会落泪的。老兄,这事你得帮我——看在我的面子上——叫你来就是干这个——我一个人也许干不了。你要是缩头不干,我就宰了你,明白吗?要是非宰你不可,那我也要治死那个女人——这样一来,我想决不会有人知道这事是什么人干的。”

“好,该杀就杀吧,这就去干。越快越好,我浑身发抖。”

“现在下手?还有外人在也不怕?听着,你有点可疑,现在不行。得等里边的灯灭了才能动手——用不着这样急。”

哈克觉得随后会有一阵沉默,这种沉默要比任何口头上说说杀人还要可怕。因此他屏住呼吸,小心翼翼往后退。他每退一步,靠单腿用力,身子先往一边倾,然后又倾向另一边,有时差点栽倒,然后小心地站稳脚跟,接着以同样的方式,冒同样的危险再挪另一只脚,就这样左右轮换着往后退——突然一根小树枝啪地一声被踩断!他憋住气,听了听。没有异样的响声——只有绝对的安静。他感到谢天谢地,现在他退回到两堵墙似的绿树之间的小道上,转身时非常小心,好像是一艘船在调头——然后步伐敏捷而又谨慎地往回走去。到了石坑那边,他觉得安全了,拔腿就跑,一路飞奔。一直跑到威尔斯曼家门口才停下来。他怦怦地敲门,接着老人和他那两个健壮的儿子从窗户里探出头。

“怎么搞的?是谁在敲门?你想干什么?”

“开门让我进去——快点!我会全告诉你们。”

“嗯?你是谁?”

“哈克贝利·费恩——快点,让我进去!”

“确实是哈克贝利·费恩,不过,冲你这名字,不会有很多人家愿意开门。孩子们,我们快开门让他进来,看是什么麻烦的事情。”

“请别告诉别人说是我讲的,”哈克进门就说,“请您务必保密,否则人家一定会要我的命。那寡妇有时对我很好,我一定要讲出来,也愿意讲出来,您可千万不要对人说是我讲的。”

“哎呀,他确实有事情要讲,否则不会这样的!”老人大声说,“孩子,说出来吧,这儿没人会讲出去的。”

三分钟后,老人和他的儿子带好武器上了山。他们手里拿着武器,踮着脚进入了绿树成荫的那条小路。哈克跟他们只走到这里,就没再往前去。他躲在一块大圆石后面,静静地听着。经过一阵沉默,哈克等急了,突然传来爆炸声和喊声。

哈克不等了解详情,跳起来拼命地冲下山坡。

The Adverntures of Tom Sawyer Chapter1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

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